Feb 132012
 

I recently came across a customer that had limited space, power and cooling in there datacentre (very few who don’t right?) but wanted to put in a Vblock but to do so would need to split most of the UCS chassis across multiple racks and at opposing ends of the datahall. Traditionally, when I design and spec a UCS system I use the default ‘passive‘ Copper Twinax SFP+. In the event I need to provide cabling for Fabric Interconnects that are more that 5 meters away from the chassis then I would use ‘active‘ Copper Twinax SFP+ as these can go up to 10 meters.

But in this case the distances are over 30 meters. The alternative is go optical by using SFP+ modules (SFP-H10GB-SR) which can more than compensate for almost any datacentre distances (300m or so).

A few of you may have noticed I said this was a Vblock, you may be thinking you will not be aloud to do this with a Vblock as it brakes the default spec. While it does go against what’s in the design for a Vblock, it is a great example of how the Vblock products are actually flexible and not as rigid a people may think and exceptions can be raised when genuine requirements demand it.

Click here for more info on installing and configuring a UCS chassis and cabling it up.

UPDATE:

Thanks to a Andrew Sharrock (@AndrewSharrock) for pointing this one out. As of UCS Software release 1.4 Fabric Extender Transceivers have been supported and are an alternative to using the above. You can get up to 100m from a FET and it supports OM2, 3 and 4 cables. I have a feeling not many people have deployed this as its Google doesn’t bring many results back on this subject but its an option. I’m not sure if VCE support it within a Vblock either (VCE peeps are welcome to confirm or deny this in the comments).

From Cisco:

To replace a copper Twinax SFP+ transceiver with an optical SFP+ transceiver, follow these steps:


Step 1 Remove the copper Twinax SFP+ from the I/O module port by pulling gently on the rubber loop (see Figure 2-19). The cable and SFP+ transceiver come out as a single unit, leaving the I/O module port empty.

Step 2 Insert the optical SFP+ transceiver into the I/O module port. Make sure that it clicks firmly into place.

Step 3 Plug the fiber optic cable into the optical SFP+ transceiver (see Figure 2-20).


Figure 2-19 Removing a Twinax Copper SFP+ Transceiver

Figure 2-20 Replacing a Copper SFP+ Transceiver With an Optical SFP+ Transceiver

Post to Twitter

Jan 032011
 

I have been pretty quiet over the last couple of months both on my blog and on twitter. Anyone that knows me will know this is quite unusual.

While I have missed the interaction with my fellow geeks I needed to re-charge my batteries and get my focus back. I had been contracting for over 2 years and felt it was the right time to take a short brake and spend the time with my family. Over 2 months later and I feel refreshed and ready to take on anything that can be thrown at me. Also spending 24/7 with your family can really make you want to go back to work. (my other half does not read my blog 😉

So while quite a few of you reading this may already be aware that I have accepted a new role I thought I would let the rest of my readers know. I have left the uncertain and quite frankly unfriendly world of contracting behind me and have gone back to the warm embrace of permanent work. While I’m sure Mr tax man will also be rubbing his hands in anticipation at this news I felt the opportunity was far to great to turn down.

I am now a Virtualisation Specialist/Consultant for BTInet. I wont go into great detail about BTInet but if you would like to find out more about the company please visit the website bellow.

BTInet Home

So expect lots of posts on Clouds, UCS, vBlocks, Flexpods and VMware. You may also see some posts on VMware’s rivals also.

I am looking to keep my hand in with the communities as networking is a fantastic way to meet like minded people and contribute my own opinions. All being well (and if I’m aloud) I will be attending the London VMUG in Feb and the next vBeers.

I am very exited about 2011 and it couldn’t have got off to a better start. I’m sure January is going to be a mentally busy month for me but I’m sure it will be immensely enjoyable also.

Post to Twitter

Twitter links powered by Tweet This v1.8.3, a WordPress plugin for Twitter.